10 Revolutionary Cars That Changed the Auto Industry Forever

Cars represent specific periods in history. For example, vintage vehicles like the Ford Galaxie 500 and Mercedes-Benz C 111 take us back to the “Space Race” period of the Cold War, when the US and the USSR fought to determine who could dominate space. But occasionally, a car arrives and transforms the environment. We’re going back in time today to examine some of the most significant automobiles in history. Consequently, these vehicles forever altered the automobile sector and compelled those in their immediate vicinity to adjust.

Ford Model T:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

Ford helped to shape the modern auto business back in the day. One of the first cars ever mass-produced, the Ford Model T, was introduced to the world by Henry Ford in 1908. Ford could produce Model Ts at a never-before-seen rate with its assembly line function while maintaining significantly cheaper costs than its rivals. Ford’s inventive and effective manufacturing method allowed the Model T to be priced between $260 and $850. Ultimately, Ford crushed the competition by selling more than 15 million Ford Model T vehicles between 1908 and 1925.

McLaren F1:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

The McLaren F1 was well ahead of its time, with a gold-plated V12 engine manufactured by BMW, three seats in the cockpit, and a top speed of 240.1 mph. The McLaren F1, which initially cost between $800,000 and $1 million, was one of the costliest cars ever made and is still highly valued today, with mint condition specimens fetching upwards of $20 million. The McLaren F1’s naturally aspirated 6.1-liter S70/2 BMW V12 produced 618 horsepower and 479 lb-ft of torque. The McLaren F1 is still the fastest naturally aspirated production vehicle today. 

Volkswagen Beetle:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 There is an odd backstory to the Volkswagen Beetle. Adolf Hitler, the leader of the Nazi party, saw the necessity for cars in the early stages of World War II. This needed to be filled with reasonably priced, readily available goods that were not overly complex. The Volkswagen Beetle, also called the VW Type 1, became “the people’s car” as a result. “Volkswagen” literally means “the people’s car” in German. It may seem a stretch to claim that one of the most significant automobiles ever made was the brainchild of one of history’s most heinous fascists, yet that is what happened.

Tesla Model S:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 Although it wasn’t the first electric vehicle (EV) or even Tesla’s first vehicle to be manufactured, it is still the most significant EV ever made. When the Model S was introduced in 2012, it was the best EV at a reasonable price. Today, things are very different from the standard Model S 60, which produced 362 horsepower and 325 lb-ft of torque from a single electric motor. Tesla was able to turn a profit on the Model S thanks to its enormous sales volume. As a result, they kept up manufacturing and began making improvements where they could. The Plaid, which has three electric motors capable of producing up to 1,020 horsepower and 1,050 lb-ft of torque, is the most potent Model S in 2023. 

Ford GT40:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 The Ford GT40 was among the greatest supercars ever made, and its Le Mans victory also altered public perception of the brand. The Ford GT40 Mk1 had a 350 horsepower 4.2-liter Ford Fairlane engine, the Mk2 had a 380 horsepower 4.7-liter Ford V8, and with Carroll Shelby’s assistance, the Mk3 Ford GT40 eventually had a 485 horsepower 7.0-liter V8. As everyone knows, a historic event gave rise to the Ford GT40’s reputation; a movie called Ford v. Ferrari was made about it. Ford crushed the Italians in the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans event, following their defeat by Ferrari in the top place in 1964 and 1965. After this race, Ford gained the admiration of global auto aficionados.

Toyota Prius:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 Hybrids used to be as rare as hen’s teeth, but in 2023, they appear everywhere. And the Toyota Prius was leading the charge in all of it. The Toyota Prius, still a best-seller today, was the first commercial hybrid automobile, even if it wasn’t the first hybrid in history. Over time, numerous design updates and significant modifications ensured that the Prius never went off public roads. 

Citroën DS:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 Discussing innovative cars without the original Citroën DS would be impossible. Unbelievably, the vintage Citroën DS included all the modern amenities seen on modern automobiles, such as air suspension, swiveling headlamps, and gripping brakes. The DS was the first mass-produced vehicle to use disc brakes all around rather than drum brakes. Eventually, in the late 1960s, Citroën equipped the DS with headlamps that could pivot in response to the direction in which the steering wheels were pointing. The idea that elements we take for granted today were genuinely developed long ago is somewhat revolutionary.

Audi Quattro:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 Group B Rally Racing, the most hazardous motorsport in the world, was very popular in the 1980s. There were no restrictions on what automakers could create, which naturally resulted in some crazy Group B rally cars. The criterion was limited to the existence of 200 road-going examples. This brings us to the Audi Quattro, the company’s Group B rally car. The Audi Sport Quattro S1 stole the show. This mean monster had an outrageous body makeover, an insane 444 horsepower turbocharged inline-five engine, and was the first rally car ever to have all-wheel or Quattro all-wheel drive. A moniker that continues to live in till today. 

Oldsmobile Jetfire:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

 The Oldsmobile Jetfire was much more than just an overpriced muscle car that the average person wouldn’t waste their money on. The first publicly available turbocharged vehicle was the Jetfire. In 1962, the Oldsmobile Jetfire and the Chevrolet Corvair Monza had turbocharged engines, but we still call the Jetfire the original. The Jetfire’s 3.5-liter V8 turbocharged engine produced 215 horsepower. That was 30 horsepower more than the naturally aspirated V8 engine, which could only muster 185 horsepower. Increased torque at the low end was another benefit of forced induction. 

BMC Mini:

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

There was a significant identity dilemma for the BMC. It was known as the Austin Mini in some regions and the Morris Mini-Minor in others. This resulted from BMC’s ownership of Austin and Morris at the time. In any case, the BMC Mini transformed the notion of the perfect city automobile. The Mini was one of the first vehicles to use a front-engine, front-wheel-drive setup, along with the original Fiat 500. This thus made it possible to have a smaller, transversely mounted four-cylinder engine without being a massive, gas-guzzling vehicle, a more reasonable price tag, more passenger space, and a larger luggage area. Because of the oil crisis, many cars still use the same formula that the BMC developed in 1959.

15 Modern Cars That Are Destined to Become Collectors’ Items

There are thousands of car models in the world. Every year, dozens of new ones are released. Some are hits, and some are misses. Most of them will be outdated in a decade. However, a select few will stand the test of time. They’re potential future legends. From innovative electric pioneers to high-octane hypercars and reborn classics, this list unveils 15 modern marvels poised to become tomorrow’s collector’s items.

15 Modern Cars That Are Destined to Become Collectors’ Items

Revir Media Group
447 Broadway
2nd FL #750
New York, NY 10013
hello@hashtaginvesting.com