8 Electric Vehicles That Failed Spectacularly – A Lesson for Future Innovations

Electric vehicles (EVs) are gradually taking over the automotive industry. There have been plenty of launches, but not all have succeeded. Manufacturers have used these as crucial stepping stones to improve on their future projects. Let us take a look at 8 EVs that failed miserably –

Think City

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 Think City, created under Think Global, was a Norwegian electric car manufacturer that started selling vehicles under the TH!NK brand. This company had high ambitions but went bankrupt. Despite its small size, the vehicle had features like regenerative braking, a user-friendly interface, and onboard diagnostics. Besides the financial crumble, major reasons included issues with the 24 kWh traction battery after their battery supplier, EnerDel, went bankrupt in 2012. Furthermore, the limited range due to its charging infrastructure and growing competition proved pivotal.

Fisker Karma

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 With one of the most extravagant designs in the market, Fisker Karma was launched in 2008, the first car from Fisker Automotives. Matters changed quickly for them as they faced lawsuits, a significant one filed by Tesla, accusing them of copying their Model S hybrid technology. They faced setbacks, particularly in terms of quality, when their A123 battery failed. Its poor build was just not acceptable for a luxury car, either. A hefty price tag comes with its expectations, which the Fisker Karma could not provide. Even after its relaunch, it collapsed due to production issues and technical failures, leading it to file for bankruptcy in 2013.

CODA Sedan

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 Aiming to revolutionize the EV market space, Coda Automotive introduced its electric sedan, which unfortunately sold only 100 units. It faced a lot of criticism from the public due to its design. While other startups aimed to create EVs from scratch, the CODA Sedan tried revamping and reengineering the Hafei Saibao. This Chinese car drew inspiration from the late 1990 version of the Mitsubishi Lancer. Establishing an old model as the bedrock of their foundation was a critical mistake, as this uninspiring base did not work in their favor. Moreover, it was priced at around $38,000. Consumers opted for better alternatives with better specifications. Failing to fulfill its promise of efficiency despite its large battery, it struggled to provide a compelling driving experience.

General Motors EV1

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 The case of the EV1 is a perfect example of a product that is not fit but rather not solely understood and utilized in the age. Dating back to its launch in the late 1990s, General Motors was ahead of its time with the concept of electric cars, and it makes people wonder if their failure was undeserved. These emission-free vehicles did not cater to the consumers’ primary needs, as they chose to lease them rather than sell them. The unavailability of the charging infrastructure at that time was underdeveloped compared to today. As they did not intend these for mass production, people started doubting their commitment towards sustainability and accused them of chasing revenue only. Soon, they faced problems from their partners and decided to shut these vehicles down entirely in 2003.

Aptera 2 series

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 When one looks at the Aptera, one cannot deny that someone from the future designed its blueprint. There were various reasons for the three-wheel, solar-assisted vehicle to fail despite its unique and attractive design. The market was unprepared for such an ambitious project, and the Aptera struggled to find potential buyers. Apart from the financial hurdles, safety was a prominent factor. The vehicle had a novel structure, and no one could estimate its safety until it was widely driven on the road. Aptera never reached its goal of delivering this holy grail to the masses, and it was forced to shut down its shop in 2011.

Faraday Future FF91

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 The story of the Faraday Future is a rollercoaster of emotions that eventually could not attain the hype for very long and diluted. Under the Chinese Billionaire Jia Yueting, the company boasted about reformatting the automotive industry with its luxury electric SUV, which would beat the fastest Tesla in a race. However, this plan did not work out, and the Faraday Future did not see itself on the road. On the contrary, it lost millions of dollars and had countless disputes, leading to Jia Yueting filing for personal bankruptcy in 2019. It encountered many lawsuits and regulatory challenges between the US and China, which led to further manufacturing delays and doubt in the minds of consumers after its sponsorship with Dragon Racing in Formula E was called off.

Better Place

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 Better Place was founded by an Israeli entrepreneur, Shai Assgasi, whose proactive vision of separating the battery from the car aimed to make these vehicles more affordable while retaining the ownership of batteries. Better Place came into the market with a solid strategy to supply these EVs to reduce the dependence on oil consumption starting in Israel. However, this optimistic approach fell short when the company’s target of selling 100,000 vehicles resulted in the sale of only 1,000 units. It further tried expanding in Denmark, where the geographical location proved to be a market fit, but failed. Better Place chose not to sell its vehicles and instead license its technology. However, this decision resulted in a scarcity of partners thanks to its cost of $500,000 per charging station.

Nikola Motors One

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 Setting goals is crucial for success, but it’s time to take a step back to avoid doom when they become too ambitious and unrealistic. Nikola Motor One, the hydrogen-powered semi-truck, serves as an eye-opener in this regard. The company has been accused of exaggerating the truck’s capabilities, including a video that falsely showcased the truck’s driving ability. During the scandals, the company faced credibility issues and a lack of partnerships with the resignation of the founder, Trevor Milton. They failed to meet expectations regarding scaling up technology and could not develop a stable hydrogen fueling infrastructure. 

15 Most Reliable Cars Ever Made — Why They Never Quit

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Some claim that the dependability of autos has decreased. Modern cars have a shorter lifespan than some cars manufactured between the 1970s and the 1990s, but some new and used cars today are good enough to last for at least ten years and up to 500,000 miles. When these vehicles break down, most problems are relatively simple, and many don’t have serious difficulties. Here are 15 of the most reliable cars ever made:

15 Most Reliable Cars Ever Made — Why They Never Quit

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